Bed Bug Life Cycle

By DoMyOwnPestControl.com staff

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Image source: cisr.ucr.edu/bed_bugs

  • The female bed bug lays between 200 to 500 eggs (in groups of 10 to 50) on rough surfaces such as paper wood.
  • Eggs are covered with a glue and hatch in about 10 days.
  • There are five progressively larger nymphal stages, each requiring a single blood meal before molting to the next stage.
  • The entire bed bug life cycle from egg to adult takes anywhere between 5 weeks to 4 months
  • Adults live up to 10 months

Life cycle or Life Stages:

The female bed bug lays between 200 to 500 eggs (in groups of 10 to 50) on rough surfaces such as paper wood. Eggs are covered with a glue and hatch in about 10 days.
There are five progressively larger nymphal stages, each requiring a single blood meal before molting to the next stage. The entire bed bug life cycle from egg to adult takes anywhere between 5 weeks to 4 months. Adults live up to 10 months.

Bed bug eggs are white to a pale creamy color. The bed bugs eggs are barely visible to the naked eye. They are anywhere from a millimeter or shorter in length. When they emerge from the egg stage they are around one to one in half millimeters. So can you see bed bugs? The answer is that they are difficult to spot at any stage. Baby bed bugs or young bed bugs emerge and go through five nymph or larva stages.

It is more specifically called “gradual metamorphosis,” meaning they will grow progressively larger with each stage only requiring a blood meal to molt into the next nymph stage. After the fifth stage, the bed bugs reach adulthood. The entire life cycle can take between five weeks to four months, depending on conditions and food sources available. Adult bedbugs can live anywhere from 12 to 18 months. Females will reproduce as long as they are able and can lay up to 500 eggs in a lifetime. They lay eggs in the same place they harbor.


 

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